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Publication Detail
Chronic Stroke Sensorimotor Impairment Is Related to Smaller Hippocampal Volumes: An ENIGMA Analysis
  • Publication Type:
    Journal article
  • Authors:
    Zavaliangos-Petropulu A, Lo B, Donnelly MR, Schweighofer N, Lohse K, Jahanshad N, Barisano G, Banaj N, Borich MR, Boyd LA, Buetefisch CM, Byblow WD, Cassidy JM, Charalambous CC, Conforto AB, DiCarlo JA, Dula AN, Egorova-Brumley N, Etherton MR, Feng W, Fercho KA, Geranmayeh F, Hanlon CA, Hayward KS, Hordacre B, Kautz SA, Khlif MS, Kim H, Kuceyeski A, Lin DJ, Liu J, Lotze M, MacIntosh BJ, Margetis JL, Mohamed FB, Piras F, Ramos-Murguialday A, Revill KP, Roberts PS, Robertson AD, Schambra HM, Seo NJ, Shiroishi MS, Stinear CM, Soekadar SR, Spalletta G, Taga M, Tang WK, Thielman GT, Vecchio D, Ward NS, Westlye LT, Werden E, Winstein C, Wittenberg GF, Wolf SL, Wong KA, Yu C, Brodtmann A, Cramer SC, Thompson PM, Liew S-L
  • Publisher:
    Ovid Technologies (Wolters Kluwer Health)
  • Publication date:
    17/05/2022
  • Journal:
    Journal of the American Heart Association
  • Volume:
    11
  • Issue:
    10
  • Article number:
    e025109
  • Medium:
    Print-Electronic
  • Status:
    Published
  • Country:
    England
  • Language:
    English
  • Keywords:
    MRI, hippocampus, sensorimotor impairment, stroke
  • Notes:
    © 2022 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License.
Abstract
Background Persistent sensorimotor impairments after stroke can negatively impact quality of life. The hippocampus is vulnerable to poststroke secondary degeneration and is involved in sensorimotor behavior but has not been widely studied within the context of poststroke upper-limb sensorimotor impairment. We investigated associations between non-lesioned hippocampal volume and upper limb sensorimotor impairment in people with chronic stroke, hypothesizing that smaller ipsilesional hippocampal volumes would be associated with greater sensorimotor impairment. Methods and Results Cross-sectional T1-weighted magnetic resonance images of the brain were pooled from 357 participants with chronic stroke from 18 research cohorts of the ENIGMA (Enhancing NeuoImaging Genetics through Meta-Analysis) Stroke Recovery Working Group. Sensorimotor impairment was estimated from the FMA-UE (Fugl-Meyer Assessment of Upper Extremity). Robust mixed-effects linear models were used to test associations between poststroke sensorimotor impairment and hippocampal volumes (ipsilesional and contralesional separately; Bonferroni-corrected, P<0.025), controlling for age, sex, lesion volume, and lesioned hemisphere. In exploratory analyses, we tested for a sensorimotor impairment and sex interaction and relationships between lesion volume, sensorimotor damage, and hippocampal volume. Greater sensorimotor impairment was significantly associated with ipsilesional (P=0.005; β=0.16) but not contralesional (P=0.96; β=0.003) hippocampal volume, independent of lesion volume and other covariates (P=0.001; β=0.26). Women showed progressively worsening sensorimotor impairment with smaller ipsilesional (P=0.008; β=-0.26) and contralesional (P=0.006; β=-0.27) hippocampal volumes compared with men. Hippocampal volume was associated with lesion size (P<0.001; β=-0.21) and extent of sensorimotor damage (P=0.003; β=-0.15). Conclusions The present study identifies novel associations between chronic poststroke sensorimotor impairment and ipsilesional hippocampal volume that are not caused by lesion size and may be stronger in women.
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