UCL  IRIS
Institutional Research Information Service
UCL Logo
Please report any queries concerning the funding data grouped in the sections named "Externally Awarded" or "Internally Disbursed" (shown on the profile page) to your Research Finance Administrator. Your can find your Research Finance Administrator at https://www.ucl.ac.uk/finance/research/rs-contacts.php by entering your department
Please report any queries concerning the student data shown on the profile page to:

Email: portico-services@ucl.ac.uk

Help Desk: http://www.ucl.ac.uk/ras/portico/helpdesk
Publication Detail
Neuronal energy use and brain evolution.
  • Publication Type:
    Journal article
  • Publication Sub Type:
    Article
  • Authors:
    Quintela-López T, Shiina H, Attwell D
  • Publisher:
    Elsevier
  • Publication date:
    20/06/2022
  • Pagination:
    R650, R655
  • Journal:
    Current Biology
  • Volume:
    32
  • Issue:
    12
  • Status:
    Published
  • Country:
    England
  • Print ISSN:
    0960-9822
  • PII:
    S0960-9822(22)00227-5
  • Language:
    eng
  • Keywords:
    Animals, Axons, Brain, Eye, Mammals, Neurons, Optic Nerve
Abstract
Consider how advantageous it might be to have eyes on our hands, rather than on our faces: depth perception would be improved by the greater distance between the eyes, and it would be easy to look into relatively inaccessible spaces by appropriate movement of the hands. The absence of mammals that use this visual strategy draws attention to constraints on how evolution is able to 'design' the nervous system. Energy use in particular, in this case the large amount of energy that would be needed to send visual information along the ∼106 optic nerve axons over the length of the arms to the brain (instead of along the much shorter optic nerve), imposes significant design constraints on the nervous system.
Publication data is maintained in RPS. Visit https://rps.ucl.ac.uk
 More search options
UCL Researchers
Author
Neuro, Physiology & Pharmacology
University College London - Gower Street - London - WC1E 6BT Tel:+44 (0)20 7679 2000

© UCL 1999–2011

Search by