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Publication Detail
Review of methods used for quantifying excess water in over-hydrated skin using evaporimetry
  • Publication Type:
    Journal article
  • Publication Sub Type:
    Article
  • Authors:
    Fader M, Clarke-O'Neill S, Wong WKR, Runeman B, Farbrot A, Cottenden A
  • Publisher:
    WILEY-BLACKWELL PUBLISHING, INC
  • Publication date:
    02/2010
  • Pagination:
    1, 8
  • Journal:
    SKIN RES TECHNOL
  • Volume:
    16
  • Issue:
    1
  • Print ISSN:
    0909-752X
  • Language:
    EN
  • Keywords:
    diapers, trans-epidermal water loss, skin hydration, review, STRATUM-CORNEUM HYDRATION, PERCEIVED COMFORT RESPONSE, FABRIC MOISTURE-CONTENT, DIAPER DERMATITIS, BARRIER FUNCTION, FIBER-TYPE, LOSS TEWL, VARIABILITY, TIME, PH
  • Addresses:
    Fader, M
    Univ Southampton
    Continence Technol & Skin Hlth Grp
    Sch Hlth Sci
    Highfield
    SO17 1BJ
    England
Abstract
BackgroundAdvances in diapers and skin barrier products are often aimed at reducing water penetration of the skin to prevent diaper dermatitis and evaporimetry has commonly been measured to quantify excess water in the skin. The aim of this study was to critically review the methods used to measure water vapour flux density (WVFD) using evaporimetry in order to identify a standardised methodology.MethodsWe used MEDLINE (1980-2008) and hand searching to identify published papers that used evaporimetry to measure WVFD when the skin has been exposed to water/saline/urine. We compared the papers with respect to subjects, sites, methods of hydrating the skin, the conditions of logging, timing and analysing the evaporimetry data.ResultsWe identified 10 papers. Methods and techniques for measuring WVFD and analysing data varied considerably between studies and it was not possible to identify a standardised method. The main sources of error and variation are discussed.ConclusionLittle work has been carried out to establish the optimum methods and techniques needed to minimise variation in measurements of WVFD using evaporimetery. There is a need to develop more robust, standardised methods and to demonstrate their reliability for further work.
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