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Publication Detail
Anhedonia, apathy, pleasure, and effort-based decision-making in adult and adolescent cannabis users and controls.
  • Publication Type:
    Journal article
  • Publication Sub Type:
    Article
  • Authors:
    Skumlien M, Mokrysz C, Freeman TP, Valton V, Wall MB, Bloomfield M, Lees R, Borissova A, Petrilli K, Giugliano M, Clisu D, Langley C, Sahakian BJ, Curran HV, Lawn W
  • Publisher:
    Cambridge University Press
  • Publication date:
    24/08/2022
  • Pagination:
    pyac056
  • Journal:
    International Journal of Neuropsychopharmacology
  • Medium:
    Print-Electronic
  • Status:
    Published
  • Country:
    England
  • Print ISSN:
    1461-1457
  • PII:
    6674260
  • Language:
    English
  • Keywords:
    adolescent, cannabis, effort, motivation, reward
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Cannabis use may be linked with anhedonia and apathy. However, previous studies have shown mixed results and few have examined the association between cannabis use and specific reward sub-processes. Adolescents may be more vulnerable to harmful effects of cannabis than adults. This study investigated (1) the association between non-acute cannabis use and apathy, anhedonia, pleasure, and effort-based decision-making for reward, and (2) whether these relationships were moderated by age-group. METHODS: We used data from the 'CannTeen' study. Participants were 274 adult (26-29 years) and adolescent (16-17 years) cannabis users (1-7 days/week use in the past three months), and gender- and age-matched controls. Anhedonia was measured with the Snaith-Hamilton Pleasure Scale (n=274), and apathy was measured with the Apathy Evaluation Scale (n=215). Effort-based decision-making for reward was measured with the Physical Effort task (n=139), and subjective wanting and liking of rewards was measured with the novel Real Reward Pleasure task (n=137). RESULTS: Controls had higher levels of anhedonia than cannabis users (F1,258=5.35, p=.02, ╬Ěp2=.02). There were no other significant effects of User-Group and no significant User-Group*Age-Group interactions. Null findings were supported by post hoc Bayesian analyses. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that cannabis use at a frequency of three to four days per week is not associated with apathy, effort-based decision-making for reward, reward wanting, or reward liking in adults or adolescents. Cannabis users had lower anhedonia than controls, albeit at a small effect size. These findings are not consistent with the hypothesis that non-acute cannabis use is associated with amotivation.
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