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Publication Detail
In vivo dissection of fly auditory mechanotransduction
  • Publication Type:
    Chapter
  • Authors:
    Albert JT, Nadrowski B, Effertz T, Gopfert MC
  • Publisher:
    WORLD SCIENTIFIC PUBL CO PTE LTD
  • Publication date:
    2009
  • Pagination:
    425, 430
  • Editors:
    Cooper NP,Kemp DT
  • ISBN-13:
    978-981-283-377-8
  • Language:
    EN
  • Keywords:
    MECHANOELECTRICAL TRANSDUCTION, ADAPTATION, CHANNELS
  • Addresses:
    Albert, JT
    UCL
    Ear Inst
    London
    WC1X 8EE
    England
Abstract
Hearing relies on specialized, mechanosensitive ion channels that transduce sound-induced vibrations into electrical signals. Linking this transduction to identified proteins has proven difficult because of the scarcity of native auditory transducers and their tight functional integration into cars. We have devised ail in vivo paradigm for the non-invasive Study of auditory transduction. By investigating displacement responses of the Drosophila Sound receiver, we find that the gating of mechanotransducer channels impacts oil the mechanics of the ear. This impact includes a nonlinear compliance that correlates with electrical nerve responses, shifts with adaptation, and conforms to the gating spring model of vertebrate auditory transduction. The discovery of spring-operated, mechanically adapting transducer channels in the Drosophila ear- the function of which call be probed in intact flies- now offers ail attractive model for the targeted molecular dissection of an auditory transducer channel complex.
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