UCL  IRIS
Institutional Research Information Service
UCL Logo
Please report any queries concerning the funding data grouped in the sections named "Externally Awarded" or "Internally Disbursed" (shown on the profile page) to your Research Finance Administrator. Your can find your Research Finance Administrator at https://www.ucl.ac.uk/finance/research/rs-contacts.php by entering your department
Please report any queries concerning the student data shown on the profile page to:

Email: portico-services@ucl.ac.uk

Help Desk: http://www.ucl.ac.uk/ras/portico/helpdesk
Publication Detail
Disrupting the experience of control in the human brain: pre-supplementary motor area contributes to the sense of agency.
  • Publication Type:
    Journal article
  • Publication Sub Type:
    Journal Article
  • Authors:
    Moore JW, Ruge D, Wenke D, Rothwell J, Haggard P
  • Publication date:
    22/08/2010
  • Pagination:
    2503, 2509
  • Journal:
    Proc Biol Sci
  • Volume:
    277
  • Issue:
    1693
  • Status:
    Published
  • Country:
    England
  • PII:
    rspb.2010.0404
  • Language:
    eng
  • Keywords:
    Adult, Awareness, Brain Mapping, Electric Stimulation, Feedback, Sensory, Female, Frontal Lobe, Humans, Male, Psychomotor Performance
Abstract
The feeling of controlling events through one's actions is fundamental to human experience, but its neural basis remains unclear. This 'sense of agency' (SoA) can be measured quantitatively as a temporal linkage between voluntary actions and their external effects. We investigated the brain areas underlying this aspect of action awareness by using theta-burst stimulation to locally and reversibly disrupt human brain function. Disruption of the pre-supplementary motor area (pre-SMA), a key structure for preparation and initiation of a voluntary action, was shown to reduce the temporal linkage between a voluntary key-press action and a subsequent electrocutaneous stimulus. In contrast, disruption of the sensorimotor cortex, which processes signals more directly related to action execution and sensory feedback, had no significant effect. Our results provide the first direct evidence of a pre-SMA contribution to SoA.
Publication data is maintained in RPS. Visit https://rps.ucl.ac.uk
 More search options
UCL Researchers
Author
Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience
Author
Clinical and Movement Neurosciences
University College London - Gower Street - London - WC1E 6BT Tel:+44 (0)20 7679 2000

© UCL 1999–2011

Search by