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Publication Detail
The FeSi phase diagram to 150 GPa
  • Publication Type:
    Journal article
  • Publication Sub Type:
    Article
  • Authors:
    Lord OT, Walter MJ, Dobson DP, Armstrong L, Clark SM, Kleppe A
  • Publisher:
    AMER GEOPHYSICAL UNION
  • Publication date:
    23/06/2010
  • Journal:
    J GEOPHYS RES-SOL EA
  • Volume:
    115
  • Print ISSN:
    0148-0227
  • Language:
    EN
  • Keywords:
    DIAMOND-ANVIL CELL, IRON-SILICON ALLOYS, EQUATION-OF-STATE, EARTHS CORE, HIGH-PRESSURE, CRYSTAL-STRUCTURE, LIGHT-ELEMENTS, MELTING CURVE, EPSILON-FESI, LOWER MANTLE
  • Addresses:
    Lord, OT
    Univ Bristol
    Dept Earth Sci
    Bristol
    BS8 1RJ
    Avon
    England
Abstract
The melting curve of FeSi has been determined to 150 GPa in the laser-heated diamond anvil cell (LH-DAC) on the basis of discontinuities in the power versus temperature function. A multianvil experimental cross-check at 12 GPa using textural criteria as a proxy for melting is in good agreement with our LH-DAC results. The melting point of FeSi reaches similar to 4000 K at the core mantle boundary and an extrapolated value of 4900 K at the inner-core boundary (ICB). We also present the melting curve as determined by the Lindemann melting law; this agrees well with our experimental curve to 70 GPa and then diverges to higher temperatures, reaching 6200 K at the ICB. These temperatures are substantially higher than previous LH-DAC determinations. The boundary of the epsilon-FeSi -> CsCl-FeSi subsolidus transition has also been determined by synchrotron-based X-ray diffraction at high pressures, and the results confirm a negative Clapeyron slope for the transition. We conclude that if present, FeSi is likely to be solid within the D '' layer and is unlikely to be present within the inner core for any plausible bulk core silicon content.
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