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Publication Detail
Plastic catalytic pyrolysis to fuels as tertiary polymer recycling method: Effect of process conditions
  • Publication Type:
    Journal article
  • Publication Sub Type:
    Article
  • Authors:
    Gulab H, Jan MR, Shah J, Manos G
  • Publisher:
    TAYLOR & FRANCIS INC
  • Publication date:
    2010
  • Pagination:
    908, 915
  • Journal:
    J ENVIRON SCI HEAL A
  • Volume:
    45
  • Issue:
    7
  • Print ISSN:
    1093-4529
  • Language:
    EN
  • Keywords:
    Pyrolysis, polymer, zeolites, fuel, hydrocarbons, HIGH-DENSITY POLYETHYLENE, ULTRASTABLE-Y-ZEOLITE, THERMAL-DEGRADATION, WASTE PLASTICS, SILICA-ALUMINA, FLUIDIZED-BED, LIQUID FUEL, HEAVY OIL, CRACKING, POLYPROPYLENE
  • Addresses:
    Manos, G
    UCL
    Dept Chem Engn
    London
    WC1E 7JE
    England
Abstract
This paper presents results regarding the effect of various process conditions on the performance of a zeolite catalyst in pyrolysis of high density polyethylene. The results show that polymer catalytic degradation can be operated at relatively low catalyst content reducing the cost of a potential industrial process. As the polymer to catalyst mass ratio increases, the system becomes less active, but high temperatures compensate for this activity loss resulting in high conversion values at usual batch times and even higher yields of liquid products due to less overcracking. The results also show that high flow rate of carrier gas causes evaporation of liquid products falsifying results, as it was obvious from liquid yield results at different reaction times as well as the corresponding boiling point distributions. Furthermore, results are presented regarding temperature effects on liquid selectivity. Similar values resulted from different final reactor temperatures, which are attributed to the batch operation of the experimental equipment. Since polymer and catalyst both undergo the same temperature profile, which is the same up to a specific time independent of the final temperature. Obviously, this common temperature step determines the selectivity to specific products. However, selectivity to specific products is affected by the temperature, as shown in the corresponding boiling point distributions, with higher temperatures showing an increased selectivity to middle boiling point components (C-8-C-9) and lower temperatures increased selectivity to heavy components (C-14-C-18).
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