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Publication Detail
Personalised Focus-Metaphor Interfaces: An Eye Tracking Study on User Confusion
  • Publication Type:
    Conference
  • Authors:
    Laqua S, Patel G, Sasse MA
  • Publisher:
    Oldenbourg Verlag
  • Publication date:
    2006
  • Place of publication:
    Munich, Germany
  • Pagination:
    175, 184
  • Published proceedings:
    Proceedings of Mensch und Computer 2006: Mensch und Computer im Strukturwandel. German Chapter of ACM
  • Editors:
    Heinecke AM,Paul H
  • ISBN-13:
    9783486581294
  • Status:
    Published
  • Notes:
    Conference took place between 03-06 Sep 2006 in Gelsenkirchen, Germany
Abstract
Personalised web interfaces are expected to improve user interaction with web content. But since the delivery of personalised web content is currently not reliable, a key question is how much users may be confused and slowed down when personalised delivery goes wrong. The aim of the study reported in this paper was to investigate a worst-case scenario of failed personalised content presentation – a dynamic presentation of content where content was dynamically presented, but content units were selected at random. We employed eye-tracking to monitor the differences in users’ attention and navigation when interacting with this “dysfunctional” dynamic interface, and a static version. We found that subjects who interacted with the dysfunctional version took 10% longer to read their material than those with static content, and displayed a different strategy in scanning the interface. The relatively small difference in navigation time in first-time viewers of dynamically presented content, and of the results from the eye-tracking patterns, suggests that users are not significantly confused and slowed down by dynamic presentation of content when using a Focus-Metaphor interface.
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