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Publication Detail
No evidence for germ-line transmission following prenatal and early postnatal AAV-mediated gene delivery
  • Publication Type:
    Journal article
  • Publication Sub Type:
    JOUR
  • Authors:
    Jakob M, Mühle C, Park J, Weiß S, Waddington S, Schneider H
  • Publication date:
    2005
  • Pagination:
    630, 637
  • Volume:
    7
  • Issue:
    6
  • Notes:
    Background: Recombinant adeno-associated viruses have been used successfully in a number of pre-clinical and clinical gene therapy studies. Since there is a broad consensus that gene therapy must not lead to germ-line transmission, the potential of such vectors for inadvertent gene transfer into germ cells deserves special attention. This applies in particular to pre- or perinatal vector application which has been considered for diseases presenting with morbidity already at birth. Methods: AAV serotype 2-derived vectors carrying a ß-galactosidase reporter gene or human clotting factor IX cDNA were injected intraperitoneally or via a yolk sac vein into mouse fetuses or administered intravascularly to newborn mice. Tissue samples of the treated animals including the gonads as well as sperm DNA, obtained by differential lysis of one testis of each male animal and the offspring of all treated mice, were investigated for the presence of vector DNA by nested PCR. In positive samples, the copy number of the vector was determined by quantitative real-time PCR. Results: AAV vectors administered intraperitoneally or intravascularly to fetal or newborn mice reached the gonads of these animals and persisted there for time periods greater than one year. Intravascular injection of the vector resulted more frequently in gene transfer to the gonads than intraperitoneal injection. Vector copy numbers in the gonads ranged from 0.3 to 74 per 104 cell equivalents. However, neither in isolated sperm DNA from the treated animals nor in their offspring were vector sequences detectable. Conclusions: These data suggest the risk for inadvertent germ-line transmission following prenatal or early postnatal AAV type 2-mediated gene delivery to be very low.
Abstract
Background: Recombinant adeno-associated viruses have been used successfully in a number of pre-clinical and clinical gene therapy studies. Since there is a broad consensus that gene therapy must not lead to germ-line transmission, the potential of such vectors for inadvertent gene transfer into germ cells deserves special attention. This applies in particular to pre- or perinatal vector application which has been considered for diseases presenting with morbidity already at birth. Methods: AAV serotype 2-derived vectors carrying a ß-galactosidase reporter gene or human clotting factor IX cDNA were injected intraperitoneally or via a yolk sac vein into mouse fetuses or administered intravascularly to newborn mice. Tissue samples of the treated animals including the gonads as well as sperm DNA, obtained by differential lysis of one testis of each male animal and the offspring of all treated mice, were investigated for the presence of vector DNA by nested PCR. In positive samples, the copy number of the vector was determined by quantitative real-time PCR. Results: AAV vectors administered intraperitoneally or intravascularly to fetal or newborn mice reached the gonads of these animals and persisted there for time periods greater than one year. Intravascular injection of the vector resulted more frequently in gene transfer to the gonads than intraperitoneal injection. Vector copy numbers in the gonads ranged from 0.3 to 74 per 104 cell equivalents. However, neither in isolated sperm DNA from the treated animals nor in their offspring were vector sequences detectable. Conclusions: These data suggest the risk for inadvertent germ-line transmission following prenatal or early postnatal AAV type 2-mediated gene delivery to be very low.
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