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Publication Detail
SWITCHING OFF ANGIOGENIC SIGNALLING: CREATING CHANNELLED CONSTRUCTS FOR ADEQUATE OXYGEN DELIVERY IN TISSUE ENGINEERED CONSTRUCTS
  • Publication Type:
    Journal article
  • Publication Sub Type:
    Article
  • Authors:
    Cheema U, Alekseeva T, Abou-Neel EA, Brown RA
  • Publisher:
    SWISS SOC BIOMATERIALS, AO RESEARCH INST
  • Publication date:
    10/2010
  • Pagination:
    274, 281
  • Journal:
    EUR CELLS MATER
  • Volume:
    20
  • Status:
    Published
  • Print ISSN:
    1473-2262
  • Language:
    EN
  • Keywords:
    3D collagen scaffolds, channelled architecture, physiological hypoxia, bone marrow stromal cells, hypoxia-inducible factor-I alpha, GROWTH-FACTOR, GLASS-FIBERS, GRADIENTS, HYPOXIA
  • Addresses:
    Cheema, U
    UCL
    UCL Div Surg & Intervent Sci, Inst Orthopaed & Musculoskeletal Sci, Tissue Repair & Engn Ctr
    London
    England
Abstract
A major question in biomimetic tissue engineering is how much of the structure/function of native vasculature needs to be reproduced for effective tissue perfusion. O-2 supplied to cells in 3D scaffolds in vitro is initially dependent upon diffusion through the scaffold and cell consumption. Low O-2 (3%) enhances specific cell behaviours, but where O-2 is critically low (pathological hypoxia) cell survival becomes compromised. We measured real-time O-2 in 3D scaffolds and introduced micro-channelled architecture to controllably increase delivery of O-2 to cells and switch off the hypoxic response. Simple static micro-channelling gives adequate perfusion and can be used to control cell generated hypoxia-induced signalling.
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