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Publication Detail
The importance of natural IgM: scavenger, protector and regulator.
  • Publication Type:
    Journal article
  • Publication Sub Type:
    Journal Article
  • Authors:
    Ehrenstein MR, Notley CA
  • Publication date:
    11/2010
  • Pagination:
    778, 786
  • Journal:
    Nat Rev Immunol
  • Volume:
    10
  • Issue:
    11
  • Status:
    Published
  • Country:
    England
  • PII:
    nri2849
  • Language:
    eng
  • Keywords:
    Animals, Atherosclerosis, Autoimmunity, B-Lymphocytes, Cell Differentiation, Humans, Immunoglobulin M, Mice
Abstract
The existence of IgM has been known for more than a century, but its importance in immunity and autoimmunity continues to emerge. Studies of mice deficient in secreted IgM have provided unexpected insights into its role in several diverse processes, from B cell survival to atherosclerosis, as well as in autoimmunity and protection against infection. Among the various distinct properties that underlie the functions of IgM, two stand out: its polyreactivity and its ability to facilitate the removal of apoptotic cells. In addition, new B cell-targeted therapies for the treatment of autoimmunity have been shown to cause a reduction in serum IgM, potentially disrupting the functions of this immunoregulatory molecule and increasing susceptibility to infection.
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