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Publication Detail
Complex controls on ostracod palaeoecology in a shallow coastal brackish-water lake: implications for palaeosalinity reconstruction
  • Publication Type:
    Journal article
  • Publication Sub Type:
    Article
  • Authors:
    Holmes J, Sayer CD, Liptrot E, Hoare DJ
  • Publisher:
    WILEY-BLACKWELL PUBLISHING, INC
  • Publication date:
    01/12/2010
  • Pagination:
    2484, 2498
  • Journal:
    FRESHWATER BIOL
  • Volume:
    55
  • Issue:
    12
  • Print ISSN:
    0046-5070
  • Language:
    EN
  • Keywords:
    brackish lake, Hickling Broad, ostracods, palaeolimnology, salinity, NORFOLK BROADLAND, UNITED-KINGDOM, HICKLING BROAD, SALINITY, ECOLOGY, CRUSTACEA, ECOSYSTEM, ENGLAND, RESTORATION, COMMUNITIES
  • Addresses:
    Holmes, J
    UCL
    Dept Geog, Environm Change Res Ctr
    London
    WC1E 6BT
    England
Abstract
1. The low-Mg calcite shells of Ostracoda (Crustacea) are often well preserved in the sediments of alkaline lakes. In coastal waters that have undergone large temporal changes in salinity, ostracod assemblages preserved in the sediment record have been used to reconstruct palaeosalinity, often assuming that salinity is the only significant control on the faunas.2. We evaluate the performance of ostracods as palaeosalinity indicators in Hickling Broad, a shallow brackish coastal lake in Norfolk, U.K., by comparing fossil ostracod assemblages covering two centuries with geochemical inferences and instrumental records of past salinity and water composition along with other palaeolimnological indicators.3. Despite large changes in the salinity of the lake and the supposed salinity sensitivity of ostracods, the fossil ostracod assemblages do not clearly reflect the salinity trends inferred from the other independent data. Rather, a complex series of changes has occurred in the lake over the past 200 years and factors other than salinity, including eutrophication, toxicity and associated complex alterations in habitat availability have probably influenced ostracod assemblages. In contrast, there is a good broad agreement between inferred or measured salinity and the trace-element chemistry of ostracod shells.4. We conclude that ostracod faunas may not always provide unambiguous palaeosalinity records and should therefore not be used to reconstruct salinity changes except as part of a multi-proxy investigation that includes other palaeoecological and /or geochemical indicators.
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