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Publication Detail
Two hominin incisor teeth from the middle Pleistocene site of Boxgrove, Sussex, England
  • Publication Type:
    Journal article
  • Publication Sub Type:
    Article
  • Authors:
    Hillson SW, Parfitt SA, Bello SM, Roberts MB, Stringer CB
  • Publisher:
    ACADEMIC PRESS LTD- ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD
  • Publication date:
    11/2010
  • Pagination:
    493, 503
  • Journal:
    Journal of Human Evolution
  • Volume:
    59
  • Issue:
    5
  • Print ISSN:
    0047-2484
  • Language:
    EN
  • Keywords:
    Scratches, Dehiscence, HUMAN ANTERIOR TEETH, DENTAL REMAINS, GINGIVAL RECESSION, WEAR STRIATIONS, HUMAN TIBIA, SPAIN, ATAPUERCA, MARKS, BONE, SIMA
  • Addresses:
    Hillson, SW
    UCL
    Inst Archaeol
    London
    WC1H 0PY
    England
Abstract
In 1995-1996 two isolated hominin lower incisors were found at the middle Pleistocene site of Boxgrove in England, with Lower Palaeolithic archaeology. Boxgrove 2 is a permanent lower right central incisor and Boxgrove 3 a permanent lower left lateral incisor. They were found separately, but close to one another and appear to belong to the same individual. The Boxgrove 1 tibia discovered in 1993 came from a different stratigraphic context and is thus believed to represent a different individual. This paper describes the morphology of the incisors, which is similar to other middle Pleistocene hominin specimens and, as with the tibia, suggests that they could be assigned to Homo heidelbergensis (recognising that the taxonomic status of this species is still a matter of debate). The incisors show substantial attrition associated with secondary dentine deposition in the pulp chamber and clearly represent an adult. They also show extensive patterns of non-masticatory scratches on the labial surfaces of both crown and root, including some marks which may have been made postmortem. The roots were exposed in life on their labial sides by a large dehiscence, extending almost to the root apex. This is demonstrated by deposits of calculus, polishing, and scratching on the exposed surfaces. The dehiscence may have been caused by repeated trauma to the gingivae or remodelling of the tooth-supporting tissues in response to large forces applied to the front of the dentition. (C) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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