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Publication Detail
Modulating inhibitory control with direct current stimulation of the superior medial frontal cortex.
  • Publication Type:
    Journal article
  • Publication Sub Type:
    Journal Article
  • Authors:
    Hsu T-Y, Tseng L-Y, Yu J-X, Kuo W-J, Hung DL, Tzeng OJL, Walsh V, Muggleton NG, Juan C-H
  • Publication date:
    15/06/2011
  • Pagination:
    2249, 2257
  • Journal:
    Neuroimage
  • Volume:
    56
  • Issue:
    4
  • Status:
    Published
  • Country:
    United States
  • PII:
    S1053-8119(11)00338-7
  • Language:
    eng
  • Keywords:
    Adult, Electric Stimulation, Female, Frontal Lobe, Humans, Inhibition, Psychological, Male, Reaction Time, Young Adult
Abstract
The executive control of voluntary action involves not only choosing from a range of possible actions but also the inhibition of responses as circumstances demand. Recent studies have demonstrated that many clinical populations, such as people with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, exhibit difficulties in inhibitory control. One prefrontal area that has been particularly associated with inhibitory control is the pre-supplementary motor area (Pre-SMA). Here we applied non-invasive transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) over Pre-SMA to test its role in this behavior. tDCS allows for current to be applied in two directions to selectively excite or suppress the neural activity of Pre-SMA. Our results showed that anodal tDCS improved efficiency of inhibitory control. Conversely, cathodal tDCS showed a tendency towards impaired inhibitory control. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of non-invasive intervention tDCS altering subjects' inhibitory control. These results further our understanding of the neural bases of inhibitory control and suggest a possible therapeutic intervention method for clinical populations.
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