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Publication Detail
How many amorphous ices are there?
  • Publication Type:
    Journal article
  • Publication Sub Type:
    Article
  • Authors:
    Loerting T, Winkel K, Seidl M, Bauer M, Mitterdorfer C, Handle PH, Salzmann CG, Mayer E, Finney JL, Bowron DT
  • Publisher:
    ROYAL SOC CHEMISTRY
  • Publication date:
    2011
  • Pagination:
    8783, 8794
  • Journal:
    PHYS CHEM CHEM PHYS
  • Volume:
    13
  • Issue:
    19
  • Print ISSN:
    1463-9076
  • Language:
    EN
  • Keywords:
    X-RAY-DIFFRACTION, PRESSURE-INDUCED AMORPHIZATION, SITU NEUTRON-DIFFRACTION, LIQUID-LIQUID TRANSITION, SOLID WATER FILMS, HIGH-DENSITY, SUPERCOOLED WATER, ASTROPHYSICAL IMPLICATIONS, 1ST-ORDER TRANSITION, THERMAL-PROPERTIES
  • Addresses:
    Loerting, T
    Univ Innsbruck
    Inst Phys Chem
    A-6020
    Innsbruck
    Austria

    UCL
    London Ctr Nanotechnol
    London
    WC1E 6BT
    England

    Rutherford Appleton Lab
    ISIS Facil
    Didcot
    OX11 0QX
    Oxon
    England
Abstract
Many acronyms are used in the literature for describing different kinds of amorphous ice, mainly because many different preparation routes and many different sample histories need to be distinguished. We here introduce these amorphous ices and discuss the question of how many of these forms are of relevance in the context of polyamorphism. We employ the criterion of reversible transitions between amorphous "states'' in finite intervals of pressure and temperature to discriminate between independent metastable amorphous "states'' and between "substates'' of the same amorphous "state''. We argue that the experimental evidence suggests we should consider there to be three polyamorphic "states'' of ice, namely low-(LDA), high-(HDA) and very high-density amorphous ice (VHDA). In addition to the realization of reversible transitions between them, they differ in terms of their properties, e. g., compressibility, or number of "interstitial'' water molecules. Thus they cannot be regarded as structurally relaxed variants of each other and so we suggest considering them as three distinct megabasins in an energy landscape visualization.
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