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Publication Detail
Non-extensive statistical physics approach to fault population distribution. A case study from the southern Hellenic arc (Central Crete)
  • Publication Type:
    Journal article
  • Publication Sub Type:
    Article
  • Authors:
    Vallianatos F, Kokinou E, Sammonds P
  • Publisher:
    VERSITA
  • Publication date:
    08/2011
  • Pagination:
    770, 784
  • Journal:
    ACTA GEOPHYS
  • Volume:
    59
  • Issue:
    4
  • Print ISSN:
    1895-6572
  • Language:
    EN
  • Keywords:
    tectonic faults, complexity, non-extensive statistical mechanics, Hellenic arc, POWER-LAW DISTRIBUTIONS, ACTIVE TECTONICS, NONEXTENSIVE STATISTICS, SUCCESSIVE EARTHQUAKES, SUBDUCTION ZONE, EVOLUTION, MODEL, SYSTEMS, STRAIN, DISPLACEMENT
  • Addresses:
    Vallianatos, F
    UCL
    Dept Earth Sci
    London
    England
Abstract
Fault population statistics play a key role in the understanding of any statistical seismicity approach. In the present work a non-extensive statistical physics approach is formulated and tested for the local fault length distribution. The approach is composed of the following parts: (i) Tsallis entropy, S (q) , (ii) maximization of the Tsallis entropy under appropriate constrains, and (iii) derivation of the cumulative distribution function (CDF) of the fault length population. This model is tested using fault length data from the Central Crete graben in front of the Hellenic arc and estimated a thermodynamic q parameter equal to 1.16, which supports the conclusion that the fault system in Central Crete graben is a sub-extensive one.
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