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Publication Detail
Beta-amyloid activates PARP causing astrocytic metabolic failure and neuronal death.
  • Publication Type:
    Journal article
  • Publication Sub Type:
    Journal Article
  • Authors:
    Abeti R, Abramov AY, Duchen MR
  • Publication date:
    06/2011
  • Pagination:
    1658, 1672
  • Journal:
    Brain
  • Volume:
    134
  • Issue:
    Pt 6
  • Status:
    Published
  • Country:
    England
  • PII:
    awr104
  • Language:
    eng
  • Keywords:
    4-Chloro-7-nitrobenzofurazan, Age Factors, Alzheimer Disease, Amyloid beta-Peptides, Analysis of Variance, Animals, Animals, Newborn, Astrocytes, Calcium, Cell Death, Coculture Techniques, Deoxyglucose, Disease Models, Animal, Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein, Glucose, Hippocampus, Membrane Potential, Mitochondrial, Mice, Mice, Transgenic, NAD, NADPH Oxidases, Neurons, Oxygen Consumption, Peptide Fragments, Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerases, Rats, Rats, Sprague-Dawley, Tetradecanoylphorbol Acetate
Abstract
Alzheimer's disease is characterized by β-amyloid accumulation in the central nervous system. As β-amyloid is neurotoxic in culture, we have explored the mechanisms of toxicity in the search for therapeutic targets for Alzheimer's disease and now identify a key role for poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase in β-amyloid-induced neuronal death. Exposure of hippocampal neuronal/glial co-cultures to β-amyloid peptides activates the glial nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase, followed by predominantly neuronal cell death. β-amyloid exposure caused the progressive loss of mitochondrial membrane potential in astrocytes, accompanied by transient mitochondrial depolarizations caused by reversible openings of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore. The transients were absent in cultures from cyclophilin D knockout mice, leaving the slow depolarization available for study in isolation. β-amyloid exposure decreased both nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide fluorescence and oxygen consumption, while provision of mitochondrial substrates reversed the depolarization, suggesting that substrate supply was limiting. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase is activated by oxidative stress and consumes nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, decreasing substrate availability. β-amyloid exposure caused accumulation of the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase product, poly-ADP-ribose polymers, in astrocytes. Inhibition of either poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase or of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase prevented the appearance of poly-ADP-ribose polymers and the mitochondrial depolarization. Exposure of co-cultures to β-amyloid for >8 h decreased nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide and mitochondrial membrane potential and increased cell death in neurons, all of which were prevented by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitors. Poly-ADP-ribose polymers increased with age in the brains of the TASTPM Alzheimer mouse model. We conclude that β-amyloid-induced neuronal death is mediated by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase in response to oxidative stress generated by the astrocytic nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase.
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Clinical and Movement Neurosciences
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Cell & Developmental Biology
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