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Publication Detail
Large-scale 2nd to 3rd century AD bloomery iron smelting in Korea
  • Publication Type:
    Journal article
  • Publication Sub Type:
    Article
  • Authors:
    Park JS, Rehren T
  • Publisher:
    ACADEMIC PRESS LTD- ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD
  • Publication date:
    06/2011
  • Pagination:
    1180, 1190
  • Journal:
    J ARCHAEOL SCI
  • Volume:
    38
  • Issue:
    6
  • Print ISSN:
    0305-4403
  • Language:
    EN
  • Keywords:
    Korea, AD 3rd century, Iron, Bloomery process, Slag, Radiocarbon, CALIBRATION
  • Addresses:
    Park, JS
    Hongik Univ
    Dept Met Engn
    Jochiwon
    339701
    Choongnam
    South Korea
Abstract
Iron production in Korea has traditionally been seen in the shadow of developments in cast iron technology in China, with limited indication for a northern influence via Russia's Maritime Province. The possibility of the existence of bloomery iron production in ancient Korea has been little explored, and relevant discussion is fraught with speculations based primarily on the early use of cast iron. The recent excavation of a site in South Korea recovered substantial amounts of slag providing direct evidence of bloomery smelting. The accelerator mass spectrometric dating of burnt wood from inside one of the slag pieces showed that the site was in use in the early 3rd century AD or earlier, which is in agreement with the assessment based on ceramic typology. The traits of a bloomery process evident in the slags' microstructure, shape, composition and excavation context are discussed along with the implications for historical iron technology in Korea, where cast iron and the influence from China have been overly emphasised. (C) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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