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Publication Detail
A rate and state friction law for saline ice
  • Publication Type:
    Journal article
  • Publication Sub Type:
    Article
  • Authors:
    Lishman B, Sammonds P, Feltham D
  • Publisher:
    AMER GEOPHYSICAL UNION
  • Publication date:
    19/05/2011
  • Journal:
    J GEOPHYS RES-OCEANS
  • Volume:
    116
  • Print ISSN:
    0148-0227
  • Language:
    EN
  • Keywords:
    COULOMBIC SHEAR FAULTS, LOW SLIDING VELOCITIES, SEA-ICE, DEPENDENT FRICTION, STICK-SLIP, RHEOLOGY, FRACTURE, MECHANISM
  • Addresses:
    Lishman, B
    UCL
    Dept Earth Sci
    Rock & Ice Phys Lab
    London
    WC1E 6BT
    England

    British Antarctic Survey
    Cambridge
    CB3 0ET
    England
Abstract
Sea ice friction models are necessary to predict the nature of interactions between sea ice floes. These interactions are of interest on a range of scales, for example, to predict loads on engineering structures in icy waters or to understand the basin-scale motion of sea ice. Many models use Amonton's friction law due to its simplicity. More advanced models allow for hydrodynamic lubrication and refreezing of asperities; however, modeling these processes leads to greatly increased complexity. In this paper we propose, by analogy with rock physics, that a rate-and state-dependent friction law allows us to incorporate memory (and thus the effects of lubrication and bonding) into ice friction models without a great increase in complexity. We support this proposal with experimental data on both the laboratory (similar to 0.1 m) and ice tank (similar to 1 m) scale. These experiments show that the effects of static contact under normal load can be incorporated into a friction model. We find the parameters for a first-order rate and state model to be A = 0.310, B = 0.382, and mu(0) = 0.872. Such a model then allows us to make predictions about the nature of memory effects in moving ice-ice contacts.
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