UCL  IRIS
Institutional Research Information Service
UCL Logo
Please report any queries concerning the funding data grouped in the sections named "Externally Awarded" or "Internally Disbursed" (shown on the profile page) to your Research Finance Administrator. Your can find your Research Finance Administrator at https://www.ucl.ac.uk/finance/research/rs-contacts.php by entering your department
Please report any queries concerning the student data shown on the profile page to:

Email: portico-services@ucl.ac.uk

Help Desk: http://www.ucl.ac.uk/ras/portico/helpdesk
Publication Detail
Thinning of the corpus callosum and cerebellar atrophy is correlated with phenotypic severity in a family with spastic paraplegia type 11.
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Mutations in the spatacsin gene are associated with spastic paraplegia type 11 (SPG11), which is the most-common cause of autosomal recessive hereditary spastic paraplegia. Although SPG11 has diverse phenotypes, thinning of the corpus callosum is an important feature. CASE REPORT: Clinical, genetic, and radiological evaluations were undertaken in a large family from Gujarat in North India with hereditary spastic paraplegia, whose affected members presented with varying degrees of spasticity, ataxia, and cognitive impairment. The clinical severity and the degree of corpus callosum and cerebellar atrophy varied among the four affected individuals in the family. Genetic testing of the affected members revealed recessive mutations in the spatacsin gene, consistent with a diagnosis of SPG11. CONCLUSIONS: We believe that the extent of corpus callosum thinning and cerebellar atrophy is correlated with disease severity in affected patients. The addition of extrapyramidal features in the most-affected members suggests that SPG11 exhibits considerable phenotypic heterogeneity.
Publication data is maintained in RPS. Visit https://rps.ucl.ac.uk
 More search options
UCL Researchers
Author
Department of Neuromuscular Diseases
University College London - Gower Street - London - WC1E 6BT Tel:+44 (0)20 7679 2000

© UCL 1999–2011

Search by