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Publication Detail
A neoHebbian framework for episodic memory; role of dopamine-dependent late LTP.
  • Publication Type:
    Journal article
  • Publication Sub Type:
    Journal Article
  • Authors:
    Lisman J, Grace AA, Duzel E
  • Publication date:
    10/2011
  • Pagination:
    536, 547
  • Journal:
    Trends Neurosci
  • Volume:
    34
  • Issue:
    10
  • Status:
    Published
  • Country:
    England
  • PII:
    S0166-2236(11)00110-X
  • Language:
    eng
  • Keywords:
    Animals, Dopamine, Long-Term Potentiation, Memory, Episodic, Neuronal Plasticity, Synapses
Abstract
According to the Hebb rule, the change in the strength of a synapse depends only on the local interaction of presynaptic and postsynaptic events. Studies at many types of synapses indicate that the early phase of long-term potentiation (LTP) has Hebbian properties. However, it is now clear that the Hebb rule does not account for late LTP; this requires an additional signal that is non-local. For novel information and motivational events such as rewards this signal at hippocampal CA1 synapses is mediated by the neuromodulator, dopamine. In this Review we discuss recent experimental findings that support the view that this 'neoHebbian' framework can account for memory behavior in a variety of learning situations.
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