UCL  IRIS
Institutional Research Information Service
UCL Logo
Please report any queries concerning the funding data grouped in the sections named "Externally Awarded" or "Internally Disbursed" (shown on the profile page) to your Research Finance Administrator. Your can find your Research Finance Administrator at https://www.ucl.ac.uk/finance/research/rs-contacts.php by entering your department
Please report any queries concerning the student data shown on the profile page to:

Email: portico-services@ucl.ac.uk

Help Desk: http://www.ucl.ac.uk/ras/portico/helpdesk
Publication Detail
Alternative splicing modulates inactivation of type 1 voltage-gated sodium channels by toggling an amino acid in the first S3-S4 linker.
  • Publication Type:
    Journal article
  • Publication Sub Type:
    Journal Article
  • Authors:
    Fletcher EV, Kullmann DM, Schorge S
  • Publication date:
    21/10/2011
  • Pagination:
    36700, 36708
  • Journal:
    J Biol Chem
  • Volume:
    286
  • Issue:
    42
  • Status:
    Published
  • Country:
    United States
  • PII:
    M111.250225
  • Language:
    eng
  • Keywords:
    Alternative Splicing, Amino Acid Substitution, Epilepsy, Exons, HEK293 Cells, Hot Temperature, Humans, Mutation, Missense, NAV1.1 Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel, Nerve Tissue Proteins, Protein Stability, Protein Structure, Secondary, Protein Structure, Tertiary, Sodium Channels
Abstract
Voltage-gated sodium channels underlie the upstroke of action potentials and are fundamental to neuronal excitability. Small changes in the behavior of these channels are sufficient to change neuronal firing and trigger seizures. These channels are subject to highly conserved alternative splicing, affecting the short linker between the third transmembrane segment (S3) and the voltage sensor (S4) in their first domain. The biophysical consequences of this alternative splicing are incompletely understood. Here we focus on type 1 sodium channels (Nav1.1) that are implicated in human epilepsy. We show that the functional consequences of alternative splicing are highly sensitive to recording conditions, including the identity of the major intracellular anion and the recording temperature. In particular, the inactivation kinetics of channels containing the alternate exon 5N are more sensitive to intracellular fluoride ions and to changing temperature than channels containing exon 5A. Moreover, Nav1.1 channels containing exon 5N recover from inactivation more rapidly at physiological temperatures. Three amino acids differ between exons 5A and 5N. However, the changes in sensitivity and stability of inactivation were reproduced by a single conserved change from aspartate to asparagine in channels containing exon 5A, which was sufficient to make them behave like channels containing the complete exon 5N sequence. These data suggest that splicing at this site can modify the inactivation of sodium channels and reveal a possible interaction between splicing and anti-epileptic drugs that stabilize sodium channel inactivation.
Publication data is maintained in RPS. Visit https://rps.ucl.ac.uk
 More search options
UCL Researchers
Author
Clinical & Experimental Epilepsy
Author
UCL School of Pharmacy
University College London - Gower Street - London - WC1E 6BT Tel:+44 (0)20 7679 2000

© UCL 1999–2011

Search by