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Publication Detail
Conversion of Solar Energy to Fuels by Inorganic Heterogeneous Systems
  • Publication Type:
    Journal article
  • Publication Sub Type:
    JOUR
  • Authors:
    Li KF, Martin D, Tang JW
  • Publication date:
    06/2011
  • Pagination:
    879, 890
  • Journal:
    Chinese Journal of Catalysis
  • Volume:
    32
  • Issue:
    6
  • Print ISSN:
    0253-9837
  • Keywords:
    solar energy, photocatalysis, carbon dioxide conversion, water splitting, VISIBLE-LIGHT IRRADIATION, TRANSIENT ABSORPTION-SPECTROSCOPY, PHOTOCATALYTIC HYDROGEN EVOLUTION, NANOCRYSTALLINE TIO2 FILMS, CARBON-DIOXIDE REDUCTION, WATER DECOMPOSITION, PHOTOPHYSICAL PROPERTIES, D(10) CONFIGURATION, ROOM-TEMPERATURE, ZINC-SULFIDE
  • Author URL:
  • Notes:
    Times Cited: 0 SCIENCE PRESS 16 DONGHUANGCHENGGEN NORTH ST, BEIJING 100717, PEOPLES R CHINA BEIJING Article 788EU English Cited References Count: 122 Tang, J. W UCL, Dept Chem Engn, Torrington Pl, London WC1E 7JE, England
Abstract
Over the last several years, the need to find clean and renewable energy sources has increased rapidly because current fossil fuels will not only eventually be depleted, but their continuous combustion leads to a dramatic increase in the carbon dioxide amount in atmosphere. Utilisation of the Sun's radiation can provide a solution to both problems. Hydrogen fuel can be generated by using solar energy to split water, and liquid fuels can be produced via direct CO(2) photoreduction. This would create an essentially free carbon or at least carbon neutral energy cycle. In this tutorial review, the current progress in fuels' generation directly driven by solar energy is summarised. Fundamental mechanisms are discussed with suggestions for future research
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