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Publication Detail
The significance of insecure attachment and disorganization in the development of children's externalizing behavior: a meta-analytic study.
  • Publication Type:
    Journal article
  • Publication Sub Type:
    Journal Article
  • Authors:
    Fearon RP, Bakermans-Kranenburg MJ, van Ijzendoorn MH, Lapsley A-M, Roisman GI
  • Publication date:
    03/2010
  • Pagination:
    435, 456
  • Journal:
    Child Dev
  • Volume:
    81
  • Issue:
    2
  • Status:
    Published
  • Country:
    United States
  • PII:
    CDEV1405
  • Language:
    eng
  • Keywords:
    Adaptation, Psychological, Aggression, Anxiety, Separation, Child, Child Behavior Disorders, Child, Preschool, Female, Humans, Infant, Internal-External Control, Male, Mother-Child Relations, Object Attachment, Personality Assessment, Reactive Attachment Disorder, Risk Factors, Sex Factors
Abstract
This study addresses the extent to which insecure and disorganized attachments increase risk for externalizing problems using meta-analysis. From 69 samples (N = 5,947), the association between insecurity and externalizing problems was significant, d = 0.31 (95% CI: 0.23, 0.40). Larger effects were found for boys (d = 0.35), clinical samples (d = 0.49), and from observation-based outcome assessments (d = 0.58). Larger effects were found for attachment assessments other than the Strange Situation. Overall, disorganized children appeared at elevated risk (d = 0.34, 95% CI: 0.18, 0.50), with weaker effects for avoidance (d = 0.12, 95% CI: 0.03, 0.21) and resistance (d = 0.11, 95% CI: -0.04, 0.26). The results are discussed in terms of the potential significance of attachment for mental health.
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