UCL  IRIS
Institutional Research Information Service
UCL Logo
Please report any queries concerning the funding data grouped in the sections named "Externally Awarded" or "Internally Disbursed" (shown on the profile page) to your Research Finance Administrator. Your can find your Research Finance Administrator at http://www.ucl.ac.uk/finance/research/post_award/post_award_contacts.php by entering your department
Please report any queries concerning the student data shown on the profile page to:

Email: portico-services@ucl.ac.uk

Help Desk: http://www.ucl.ac.uk/ras/portico/helpdesk
Publication Detail
The effects of maternal postnatal depression and child sex on academic performance at age 16 years: a developmental approach.
  • Publication Type:
    Journal article
  • Publication Sub Type:
    JOURNAL ARTICLE
  • Authors:
    Murray L, Arteche A, Fearon P, Halligan S, Croudace T, Cooper P
  • Publication date:
    04/05/2010
  • Journal:
    J Child Psychol Psychiatry
  • PII:
    JCPP2259
  • Language:
    ENG
  • Addresses:
    University of Reading, UK.
Abstract
Background: Postnatal depression (PND) is associated with poor cognitive functioning in infancy and the early school years; long-term effects on academic outcome are not known. Method: Children of postnatally depressed (N = 50) and non-depressed mothers (N = 39), studied from infancy, were followed up at 16 years. We examined the effects on General Certificate of Secondary Education (GCSE) exam performance of maternal depression (postnatal and subsequent) and IQ, child sex and earlier cognitive development, and mother-child interactions, using structural equation modelling (SEM). Results: Boys, but not girls, of PND mothers had poorer GCSE results than control children. This was principally accounted for by effects on early child cognitive functioning, which showed strong continuity from infancy. PND had continuing negative effects on maternal interactions through childhood, and these also contributed to poorer GCSE performance. Neither chronic, nor recent, exposure to maternal depression had significant effects. Conclusions: The adverse effects of PND on male infants' cognitive functioning may persist through development. Continuing difficulties in mother-child interactions are also important, suggesting that both early intervention and continuing monitoring of mothers with PND may be warranted.
Publication data is maintained in RPS. Visit https://rps.ucl.ac.uk
 More search options
UCL Researchers
Author
Clinical, Edu & Hlth Psychology
University College London - Gower Street - London - WC1E 6BT Tel:+44 (0)20 7679 2000

© UCL 1999–2011

Search by