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Publication Detail
The frequency of visually induced γ-band oscillations depends on the size of early human visual cortex.
  • Publication Type:
    Journal article
  • Publication Sub Type:
    Comparative Study
  • Authors:
    Schwarzkopf DS, Robertson DJ, Song C, Barnes GR, Rees G
  • Publication date:
    25/01/2012
  • Pagination:
    1507, 1512
  • Journal:
    J Neurosci
  • Volume:
    32
  • Issue:
    4
  • Country:
    United States
  • PII:
    32/4/1507
  • Language:
    eng
  • Keywords:
    Adult, Brain Waves, Evoked Potentials, Visual, Female, Humans, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Magnetoencephalography, Male, Photic Stimulation, Visual Cortex, Visual Perception, Young Adult
  • Notes:
    PMCID: PMC3276841
Abstract
The structural and functional architecture of the human brain is characterized by considerable variability, which has consequences for visual perception. However, the neurophysiological events mediating the relationship between interindividual differences in cortical surface area and visual perception have, until now, remained unknown. Here, we show that the retinotopically defined surface areas of central V1 and V2 are correlated with the peak frequency of visually induced oscillations in the gamma band, as measured with magnetoencephalography. Gamma-band oscillations are thought to play an important role in visual processing. We propose that individual differences in macroscopic gamma frequency may be attributed to interindividual variability in the microscopic architecture of visual cortex.
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Imaging Neuroscience
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