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Publication Detail
Diagnostic modelling of multi-parametric MRI as a radiological tool to predict transition zone prostate cancer
  • Publication Type:
    Conference
  • Authors:
    Dikaios N, Fujiwara T, Abd Alazeez M, Atkinson D, Punwani S
  • Publication date:
    20/04/2012
  • Pagination:
    547, ?
  • Status:
    Published
  • Name of conference:
    ISMRM 2012
  • Conference place:
    Melbourne, Australia
  • Conference start date:
    07/05/2012
  • Conference finish date:
    12/05/2012
Abstract
Multi-parametric MRI has a reported sensitivity of 73% and specificity of 89% for detection of tumour within the peripheral zone of the prostate. However, benign prostatic hypertrophy as commonly found in the transition zone produces signal changes that make the radiologists detection of anterior gland tumour more difficult. Our study derived a predictive model for classification of suspected sites of anterior gland disease based on clinical (age, PSA, gland volume, PSA density), quantitative MRI parameters (ADC, contrast enhanced, T2 image signal) and textural features of MR images (entropy, contrast, co-occurance); and compared the performance of this model for detection of tumour against a consensus radiologist opinion.
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