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Publication Detail
Modifying three-dimensional scaffolds from novel nanocomposite materials using dissolvable porogen particles for use in liver tissue engineering.
  • Publication Type:
    Journal article
  • Publication Sub Type:
    Journal Article
  • Authors:
    Adwan H, Fuller B, Seldon C, Davidson B, Seifalian A
  • Publication date:
    08/2013
  • Pagination:
    250, 261
  • Journal:
    J Biomater Appl
  • Volume:
    28
  • Issue:
    2
  • Country:
    England
  • PII:
    0885328212445404
  • Language:
    eng
  • Keywords:
    HepG2, POSS-modified polycaprolactone urea urethane, hepatocytes, nanocomposite polymers, porogens, scaffolds, tissue engineering, Cell Adhesion, Glucose, Hep G2 Cells, Humans, Liver, Nanocomposites, Organosilicon Compounds, Polyesters, Polyurethanes, Porosity, Sodium Bicarbonate, Sodium Chloride, Tissue Engineering, Tissue Scaffolds
Abstract
Although hepatocytes have a remarkable regenerative power, the rapidity of acute liver failure makes liver transplantation the only definitive treatment. Attempts to incorporate engineered three-dimensional liver tissue in bioartificial liver devices or in implantable tissue constructs, to treat or bridge patients to self-recovery, were met with many challenges, amongst which is to find suitable polymeric matrices. We studied the feasibility of utilising nanocomposite polymers in three-dimensional scaffolds for hepatocytes.
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