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Publication Detail
The emergence and representation of knowledge about social and nonsocial hierarchies.
  • Publication Type:
    Journal article
  • Publication Sub Type:
    Journal Article
  • Authors:
    Kumaran D, Melo HL, Duzel E
  • Publication date:
    08/11/2012
  • Pagination:
    653, 666
  • Journal:
    Neuron
  • Volume:
    76
  • Issue:
    3
  • Status:
    Published
  • Country:
    United States
  • PII:
    S0896-6273(12)00889-6
  • Language:
    eng
  • Keywords:
    Adult, Amygdala, Female, Hierarchy, Social, Hippocampus, Humans, Learning, Male, Photic Stimulation, Psychomotor Performance, Social Behavior, Young Adult
Abstract
Primates are remarkably adept at ranking each other within social hierarchies, a capacity that is critical to successful group living. Surprisingly little, however, is understood about the neurobiology underlying this quintessential aspect of primate cognition. In our experiment, participants first acquired knowledge about a social and a nonsocial hierarchy and then used this information to guide investment decisions. We found that neural activity in the amygdala tracked the development of knowledge about a social, but not a nonsocial, hierarchy. Further, structural variations in amygdala gray matter volume accounted for interindividual differences in social transitivity performance. Finally, the amygdala expressed a neural signal selectively coding for social rank, whose robustness predicted the influence of rank on participants' investment decisions. In contrast, we observed that the linear structure of both social and nonsocial hierarchies was represented at a neural level in the hippocampus. Our study implicates the amygdala in the emergence and representation of knowledge about social hierarchies and distinguishes the domain-general contribution of the hippocampus.
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