UCL  IRIS
Institutional Research Information Service
UCL Logo
Please report any queries concerning the funding data grouped in the sections named "Externally Awarded" or "Internally Disbursed" (shown on the profile page) to your Research Finance Administrator. Your can find your Research Finance Administrator at https://www.ucl.ac.uk/finance/research/rs-contacts.php by entering your department
Please report any queries concerning the student data shown on the profile page to:

Email: portico-services@ucl.ac.uk

Help Desk: http://www.ucl.ac.uk/ras/portico/helpdesk
Publication Detail
The cytoplasm of living cells behaves as a poroelastic material.
  • Publication Type:
    Journal article
  • Publication Sub Type:
    Journal Article
  • Authors:
    Moeendarbary E, Valon L, Fritzsche M, Harris AR, Moulding DA, Thrasher AJ, Stride E, Mahadevan L, Charras GT
  • Publication date:
    03/2013
  • Pagination:
    253, 261
  • Journal:
    Nat Mater
  • Volume:
    12
  • Issue:
    3
  • Status:
    Published
  • Country:
    England
  • Print ISSN:
    1476-1122
  • PII:
    nmat3517
  • Language:
    eng
  • Keywords:
    Biomechanical Phenomena, Cell Shape, Cell Size, Cytoplasm, Cytoskeleton, Elasticity, Models, Biological, Porosity, Rheology, Stress, Mechanical
Abstract
The cytoplasm is the largest part of the cell by volume and hence its rheology sets the rate at which cellular shape changes can occur. Recent experimental evidence suggests that cytoplasmic rheology can be described by a poroelastic model, in which the cytoplasm is treated as a biphasic material consisting of a porous elastic solid meshwork (cytoskeleton, organelles, macromolecules) bathed in an interstitial fluid (cytosol). In this picture, the rate of cellular deformation is limited by the rate at which intracellular water can redistribute within the cytoplasm. However, direct supporting evidence for the model is lacking. Here we directly validate the poroelastic model to explain cellular rheology at short timescales using microindentation tests in conjunction with mechanical, chemical and genetic treatments. Our results show that water redistribution through the solid phase of the cytoplasm (cytoskeleton and macromolecular crowders) plays a fundamental role in setting cellular rheology at short timescales.
Publication data is maintained in RPS. Visit https://rps.ucl.ac.uk
 More search options
UCL Researchers Show More
Author
London Centre for Nanotechnology
Author
Dept of Mechanical Engineering
Author
Developmental Biology & Cancer Dept
Author
Infection, Immunity & Inflammation Dept
University College London - Gower Street - London - WC1E 6BT Tel:+44 (0)20 7679 2000

© UCL 1999–2011

Search by