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Publication Detail
Kohlschütter-Tönz Syndrome: Mutations in ROGDI and Evidence of Genetic Heterogeneity
  • Publication Type:
    Journal article
  • Publication Sub Type:
    Journal Article
  • Authors:
    Tucci A, Kara E, Schossig A, Wolf NI, Plagnol V, Fawcett K, Paisán-Ruiz C, Moore M, Hernandez D, Musumeci S, Tennison M, Hennekam R, Palmeri S, Malandrini A, Raskin S, Donnai D, Hennig C, Tzschach A, Hordijk R, Bast T, Wimmer K, Lo CN, Shorvon S, Mefford H, Eichler EE, Hall R, Hayes I, Hardy J, Singleton A, Zschocke J, Houlden H
  • Publication date:
    01/02/2013
  • Pagination:
    296, 300
  • Journal:
    Human Mutation
  • Volume:
    34
  • Issue:
    2
  • Status:
    Published
  • Print ISSN:
    1059-7794
Abstract
Kohlschütter-Tönz syndrome (KTS) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by amelogenesis imperfecta, psychomotor delay or regression and seizures starting early in childhood. KTS was established as a distinct clinical entity after the first report by Kohlschütter in 1974, and to date, only a total of 20 pedigrees have been reported. The genetic etiology of KTS remained elusive until recently when mutations in ROGDI were independently identified in three unrelated families and in five likely related Druze families. Herein, we report a clinical and genetic study of 10 KTS families. By using a combination of whole exome sequencing, linkage analysis, and Sanger sequencing, we identify novel homozygous or compound heterozygous ROGDI mutations in five families, all presenting with a typical KTS phenotype. The other families, mostly presenting with additional atypical features, were negative for ROGDI mutations, suggesting genetic heterogeneity of atypical forms of the disease. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
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