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Publication Detail
Do people trust their eyes more than ears?: media bias in detecting cues of expertise
  • Publication Type:
    Conference
  • Authors:
    Riegelsberger J, Sasse MA, McCarthy JD
  • Publisher:
    ACM
  • Publication date:
    2005
  • Place of publication:
    New York
  • Pagination:
    1745, 1748
  • Status:
    Published
  • Name of conference:
    Human Factors in Computing Systems CHI 2005
  • Conference start date:
    01/04/4005
  • Keywords:
    trust, usability, system design
Abstract
April 2005, Enabling users to identify trustworthy actors is a key design concern in online systems and expertise is a core dimension of trustworthiness. In this paper, we investigate (1) users' ability to identify expertise in advice and (2) effects of media bias in different representations. In a laboratory study, we presented 160 participants with two advisors -- one represented by text-only; the other represented by one of four alternate formats: video, audio, avatar, or photo+text. Unknown to the participants, one was an expert (i.e. trained) and the other was a non-expert (i.e. untrained). We observed participants' advice seeking behavior under financial risk as an indicator of their trust in the advisor. For all rich media representations, participants were able to identify the expert, but we also found a tendency for seeking video and audio advice, irrespective of expertise. Avatar advice, in contrast, was rarely sought, but -- like the other rich media representations -- was seen as more enjoyable and friendly than text-only advice. In a future step we plan to analyze our data for effects on advice uptake.
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