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Publication Detail
Left insular cortex and left SFG underlie prismatic adaptation effects on time perception: evidence from fMRI.
  • Publication Type:
    Journal article
  • Publication Sub Type:
    Journal Article
  • Authors:
    Magnani B, Frassinetti F, Ditye T, Oliveri M, Costantini M, Walsh V
  • Publication date:
    15/05/2014
  • Pagination:
    340, 348
  • Journal:
    Neuroimage
  • Volume:
    92
  • Status:
    Published
  • Country:
    United States
  • PII:
    S1053-8119(14)00049-4
  • Language:
    eng
  • Keywords:
    Left frontal lobe, Prismatic adaptation, Spatial representation of time, Adaptation, Physiological, Adolescent, Adult, Brain Mapping, Cerebral Cortex, Evidence-Based Medicine, Female, Figural Aftereffect, Humans, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Nerve Net, Neuronal Plasticity, Prefrontal Cortex, Space Perception, Time Perception, Young Adult
Abstract
Prismatic adaptation (PA) has been shown to affect left-to-right spatial representations of temporal durations. A leftward aftereffect usually distorts time representation toward an underestimation, while rightward aftereffect usually results in an overestimation of temporal durations. Here, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to study the neural mechanisms that underlie PA effects on time perception. Additionally, we investigated whether the effect of PA on time is transient or stable and, in the case of stability, which cortical areas are responsible of its maintenance. Functional brain images were acquired while participants (n=17) performed a time reproduction task and a control-task before, immediately after and 30 min after PA inducing a leftward aftereffect, administered outside the scanner. The leftward aftereffect induced an underestimation of time intervals that lasted for at least 30 min. The left anterior insula and the left superior frontal gyrus showed increased functional activation immediately after versus before PA in the time versus the control-task, suggesting these brain areas to be involved in the executive spatial manipulation of the representation of time. The left middle frontal gyrus showed an increase of activation after 30 min with respect to before PA. This suggests that this brain region may play a key role in the maintenance of the PA effect over time.
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