UCL  IRIS
Institutional Research Information Service
UCL Logo
Please report any queries concerning the funding data grouped in the sections named "Externally Awarded" or "Internally Disbursed" (shown on the profile page) to your Research Finance Administrator. Your can find your Research Finance Administrator at http://www.ucl.ac.uk/finance/research/post_award/post_award_contacts.php by entering your department
Please report any queries concerning the student data shown on the profile page to:

Email: portico-services@ucl.ac.uk

Help Desk: http://www.ucl.ac.uk/ras/portico/helpdesk
Publication Detail
A Framework for peer-to-peer micro-blogging
Abstract
The recent rise in the popularity of micro-blogging has been accompanied by concerns over censorship and anonymity in centralized systems. Thus, we consider the problem of implementing a micro-blogging social network over an unstructured Peer-to-Peer network. The problem can be decomposed into two sub-problems, dissemination (also known as replication) and retrieval, which are coupled. For example, the more a blog post is disseminated, the fewer nodes need to be queried in order to retrieve it with a high probability. Both dissemination and retrieval incur bandwidth costs. In this paper, we investigate the optimal replication of data, in the sense of minimizing bandwidth, and the balance between the number of nodes a micro-blog post is replicated to and the number of nodes that must be queried. Minimizing the system bandwidth is critical if our proposed system is to scale from small to larger networks. Our theoretical, probabilistic analysis predicts that micro-blog posts should be replicated onto approximately 20% and 6% of nodes in networks of 10, 000 and 100, 000 nodes respectively in order to minimize the overall bandwidth of the system. © 2013 IEEE.
Publication data is maintained in RPS. Visit https://rps.ucl.ac.uk
 More search options
UCL Researchers
Author
Dept of Computer Science
University College London - Gower Street - London - WC1E 6BT Tel:+44 (0)20 7679 2000

© UCL 1999–2011

Search by