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Publication Detail
Analysis of Parkinson's disease brain-derived DNA for alpha-synuclein coding somatic mutations.
  • Publication Type:
    Journal article
  • Publication Sub Type:
    Journal Article
  • Authors:
    Proukakis C, Shoaee M, Morris J, Brier T, Kara E, Sheerin U-M, Charlesworth G, Tolosa E, Houlden H, Wood NW, Schapira AH
  • Publication date:
    07/2014
  • Pagination:
    1060, 1064
  • Journal:
    Mov Disord
  • Volume:
    29
  • Issue:
    8
  • Status:
    Published
  • Country:
    United States
  • Language:
    eng
  • Keywords:
    SNCA, alpha-synuclein, etiology of Parkinson's disease, mosaicism, somatic mutation, Brain, DNA, Female, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Genetic Testing, Humans, Lewy Body Disease, Male, Mutation, Parkinson Disease, alpha-Synuclein
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Although alpha-synuclein (SNCA) is crucial to the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD) and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), mutations in the gene appear to be rare. We have recently hypothesized that somatic mutations in early development could contribute to PD. METHODS: Expanding on our recent negative small study, we used high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis to screen SNCA coding exons for somatic point mutations in DNA from 539 PD and DLB cerebellar samples, with two additional regions (frontal cortex, substantia nigra) for 20 PD cases. We used artificial mosaics to determine sensitivity where possible. RESULTS: We did not detect any evidence of somatic coding mutations. Three cases were heterozygous for known silent polymorphisms. The protocol we used was sensitive enough to detect 5% to 10% mutant DNA. CONCLUSION: Using DNA predominantly from cerebellum, but also from frontal cortex and substantia nigra (nā€‰=ā€‰20 each), we have not detected any somatic coding SNCA point mutations.
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Department of Neuromuscular Diseases
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Clinical and Movement Neurosciences
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Clinical and Movement Neurosciences
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Clinical and Movement Neurosciences
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