UCL  IRIS
Institutional Research Information Service
UCL Logo
Please report any queries concerning the funding data grouped in the sections named "Externally Awarded" or "Internally Disbursed" (shown on the profile page) to your Research Finance Administrator. Your can find your Research Finance Administrator at http://www.ucl.ac.uk/finance/research/post_award/post_award_contacts.php by entering your department
Please report any queries concerning the student data shown on the profile page to:

Email: portico-services@ucl.ac.uk

Help Desk: http://www.ucl.ac.uk/ras/portico/helpdesk
Publication Detail
Do clay mineral dissolution rates reach steady state?
  • Publication Type:
    Journal article
  • Publication Sub Type:
    Journal Article
  • Authors:
    Köhler SJ, Bosbach D, Oelkers EH
  • Publication date:
    15/04/2005
  • Pagination:
    1997, 2006
  • Journal:
    Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta
  • Volume:
    69
  • Issue:
    8
  • Status:
    Published
  • Print ISSN:
    0016-7037
Abstract
The temporal evolution of natural illite du Puy dissolution rates was measured from Si release rates in single-pass flow-through experiments lasting at least 100 days at 25°C and pH ranging from 2 to 12. Si release rates decreased by a factor of five and three at pH 12 and 2, respectively, during the experiments. These observations are interpreted to stem from changes in illite du Puy reactive surface area during these experiments. As the edges of clay minerals dissolve faster than the basal planes, dissolution tends to change clay mineral morphology decreasing the percentage of reactive edge sites. This continuously changing morphology prevents illite dissolution rates from attaining steady state during laboratory experiments lasting 100 to 200 days. A similar temporal decrease in dissolution rates is evident for many different sets of clay mineral dissolution rate data available in the literature. It seems reasonable, therefore, to expect that clay mineral dissolution does not attain steady state in nature, but rather their dissolution rates decrease continuously during their dissolution. Copyright © 2005 Elsevier Ltd.
Publication data is maintained in RPS. Visit https://rps.ucl.ac.uk
 More search options
There are no UCL People associated with this publication
University College London - Gower Street - London - WC1E 6BT Tel:+44 (0)20 7679 2000

© UCL 1999–2011

Search by