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Publication Detail
A role for pericytes in coronary no-reflow
  • Publication Type:
    Journal article
  • Publication Sub Type:
    Review
  • Authors:
    O'Farrell FM, Attwell D
  • Publication date:
    01/01/2014
  • Pagination:
    427, 432
  • Journal:
    Nature Reviews Cardiology
  • Volume:
    11
  • Issue:
    7
  • Status:
    Published
  • Print ISSN:
    1759-5002
Abstract
Despite efforts to restore tissue perfusion after myocardial infarction, coronary no-reflow -a failure to achieve adequate reperfusion of the cardiac microcirculation -is a common complication, which correlates with an increased incidence of death and disability. The treatment of ischaemic stroke is also plagued by no-reflow and, in the brain, a major cause of this phenomenon has been shown to be contractile microvascular pericytes irreversibly constricting capillaries and dying. We propose that cardiac pericytes, which are the second most-common cell type in the heart, impede reperfusion of coronary capillaries in a similar fashion to those in the brain after a stroke. Pericyte constriction might contribute to morbidity in patients by causing microvascular obstruction, even after successful treatment of coronary artery block. The similarity of the no-reflow phenomenon in the brain and in the heart suggests that cardiac pericytes are a novel therapeutic target for coronary no-reflow after myocardial infarction. © 2014 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.
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