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Publication Detail
The perceptual and functional consequences of parietal top-down modulation on the visual cortex.
  • Publication Type:
    Journal article
  • Publication Sub Type:
    Article
  • Authors:
    Silvanto J, Muggleton N, Lavie N, Walsh V
  • Publication date:
    2009
  • Pagination:
    327, 330
  • Journal:
    Cerebral Cortex
  • Volume:
    19
  • Issue:
    2
  • Print ISSN:
    1047-3211
Abstract
The posterior parietal cortex (PPC) has been proposed to play a critical role in exerting top-down influences on occipital visual areas. By inducing activity in the PPC (angular gyrus) using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), and using the phosphene threshold as a measure of visual cortical excitability, we investigated the functional role of this region in modulating the activity of the visual cortex. When triple-pulses of TMS were applied over the PPC unilaterally, the intensity of stimulation required to elicit a phosphene from the visual cortex (area V1/V2) was reduced, indicating an increase in visual cortical excitability. The increased excitability that was observed with unilateral TMS was abolished when TMS was applied over the PPC bilaterally. Our results provide a demonstration of the top-down modulation exerted by the PPC on the visual cortex and show that these effects are subject to interhemispheric competition.
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Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience
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Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience
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