UCL  IRIS
Institutional Research Information Service
UCL Logo
Please report any queries concerning the funding data grouped in the sections named "Externally Awarded" or "Internally Disbursed" (shown on the profile page) to your Research Finance Administrator. Your can find your Research Finance Administrator at http://www.ucl.ac.uk/finance/research/post_award/post_award_contacts.php by entering your department
Please report any queries concerning the student data shown on the profile page to:

Email: portico-services@ucl.ac.uk

Help Desk: http://www.ucl.ac.uk/ras/portico/helpdesk
Publication Detail
Motor skill learning requires active central myelination.
  • Publication Type:
    Journal article
  • Publication Sub Type:
    Journal Article
  • Authors:
    McKenzie IA, Ohayon D, Li H, de Faria JP, Emery B, Tohyama K, Richardson WD
  • Publication date:
    17/10/2014
  • Pagination:
    318, 322
  • Journal:
    Science
  • Volume:
    346
  • Issue:
    6207
  • Status:
    Published
  • Country:
    United States
  • PII:
    346/6207/318
  • Language:
    eng
  • Keywords:
    Animals, Brain, Cell Proliferation, Gene Deletion, Humans, Learning, Male, Mental Recall, Mice, Mice, Transgenic, Motor Skills, Myelin Sheath, Oligodendroglia, Synaptic Transmission, Transcription Factors
Abstract
Myelin-forming oligodendrocytes (OLs) are formed continuously in the healthy adult brain. In this work, we study the function of these late-forming cells and the myelin they produce. Learning a new motor skill (such as juggling) alters the structure of the brain's white matter, which contains many OLs, suggesting that late-born OLs might contribute to motor learning. Consistent with this idea, we show that production of newly formed OLs is briefly accelerated in mice that learn a new skill (running on a "complex wheel" with irregularly spaced rungs). By genetically manipulating the transcription factor myelin regulatory factor in OL precursors, we blocked production of new OLs during adulthood without affecting preexisting OLs or myelin. This prevented the mice from mastering the complex wheel. Thus, generation of new OLs and myelin is important for learning motor skills.
Publication data is maintained in RPS. Visit https://rps.ucl.ac.uk
 More search options
UCL Researchers
Author
Wolfson Inst for Biomedical Research
Author
Wolfson Inst for Biomedical Research
University College London - Gower Street - London - WC1E 6BT Tel:+44 (0)20 7679 2000

© UCL 1999–2011

Search by