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Publication Detail
A second look at the geologic map of China: The "sloss approach"
  • Publication Type:
    Journal article
  • Publication Sub Type:
    Journal Article
  • Authors:
    Vermeesch P
  • Publication date:
    01/01/2003
  • Pagination:
    119, 132
  • Journal:
    International Geology Review
  • Volume:
    45
  • Issue:
    2
  • Status:
    Published
  • Print ISSN:
    0020-6814
Abstract
A key tool for geologic or tectonic reconstruction is the geologic map. When one attempts to understand an area as large and complicated as China, this tool contains more information than is optimal. The presence of too much detail can obscure important general trends. To facilitate the understanding of the major tectonic events that took place in China during the Phanerozoic, the geologic and tectonic maps of China are simplified and recast in an easily interpretable format. A methodology is presented that is similar to the one introduced by L. L. Sloss in the early days of plate tectonics and sequence stratigraphy. Each tectonic zone of China is represented by one "Sloss curve," which is a time-series representation of the geologic map. The curve shape reflects the geological response to tectonic changes. Patterns emerge when the "Sloss curves" are compared and correlated between the tectonic zones. The compiled "Sloss map" can be used as a low-pass filter of tectonic events. Two events clearly stand out across the "Sloss map" of China: the Permo-Triassic North China-South China collision, and the Cenozoic India-Eurasia collision. © 2003 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.
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