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Publication Detail
Ongoing developments in sporadic inclusion body myositis.
  • Publication Type:
    Journal article
  • Publication Sub Type:
    Journal Article
  • Authors:
    Machado PM, Ahmed M, Brady S, Gang Q, Healy E, Morrow JM, Wallace AC, Dewar L, Ramdharry G, Parton M, Holton JL, Houlden H, Greensmith L, Hanna MG
  • Publication date:
    12/2014
  • Pagination:
    477, ?
  • Journal:
    Curr Rheumatol Rep
  • Volume:
    16
  • Issue:
    12
  • Status:
    Published
  • Country:
    United States
  • Language:
    eng
  • Keywords:
    Aging, Biomarkers, Humans, Muscle, Skeletal, Myositis, Inclusion Body
Abstract
Sporadic inclusion body myositis (IBM) is an acquired muscle disorder associated with ageing, for which there is no effective treatment. Ongoing developments include: genetic studies that may provide insights regarding the pathogenesis of IBM, improved histopathological markers, the description of a new IBM autoantibody, scrutiny of the diagnostic utility of clinical features and biomarkers, the refinement of diagnostic criteria, the emerging use of MRI as a diagnostic and monitoring tool, and new pathogenic insights that have led to novel therapeutic approaches being trialled for IBM, including treatments with the objective of restoring protein homeostasis and myostatin blockers. The effect of exercise in IBM continues to be investigated. However, despite these ongoing developments, the aetiopathogenesis of IBM remains uncertain. A translational and multidisciplinary collaborative approach is critical to improve the diagnosis, treatment, and care of patients with IBM.
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Department of Neuromuscular Diseases
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Department of Neuromuscular Diseases
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Clinical and Movement Neurosciences
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Department of Neuromuscular Diseases
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Department of Neuromuscular Diseases
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Department of Neuromuscular Diseases
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