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Prof Georgina Mace
Centre for Biodiversity and Environment Research (CBER)
GEE, Medawar Building
UCL
London
WC1E 6BT
Tel: 020 31081125
Appointment
  • Professor of Biodiversity and Ecosystems
  • Genetics, Evolution & Environment
  • Div of Biosciences
  • Faculty of Life Sciences
 
 
Biography

Georgina Mace is Professor of Biodiversity and Ecosystems and Director of the UCL Centre for Biodiversity and Environment Research (CBER). She joined UCL in 2012 from Imperial College where she was Director of the NERC Centre for Population Biology. Her research interests are in measuring the trends and consequences of biodiversity loss and ecosystem change. She led the development of criteria for listing species on IUCN’s Red List of threatened species, and was a coordinating lead author for biodiversity in the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment (www.maweb.org). Recently she has worked on the UK National Ecosystem Assessment (uknea.unep-wcmc.org/), was a co-investigator on the NERC Valuing Nature Network, and Associate Director of the Ecosystem Services for Poverty Alleviation Programme, funded by DfID, NERC and ESRC (www.espa.ac.uk). She was elected FRS in 2002, and was the 2007 winner of the international Cosmos prize. She was President of the Society for Conservation Biology from 2007-2009, and President of the British Ecological Society from 2011-2013. Currently she is  a NERC Council member, member of the Council of the Royal Society, and Chair of the science committee for the DIVERSITAS global change research programme.

Research Groups
Research Summary

My interests are in measuring the trends and consequences of biodiversity loss and ecosystem change.

Biodiversity assessment

Biodiversity is a concept that is hard to summarise but its increasing policy presence means that it is important to consider how best to measure it. In terms of many national and national policy contexts, this means that it needs to reflect more than simple measures of species and population diversity. I am interested in the ecological and evolutionary aspects of biodiversity science that should be incorporated into measures of biodiversity.

Climate change impacts on species and ecosystems

Existing methods for assessing climate change impacts tend to be based on spatial distributions and environmental associations. Yet species, population and community responses to climate change will be mediated through their ecology and evolutionary history. Currently I am working with colleagues to identify and prioritise the aspects of species biology that will most affect species and population vulnerability. Part of this work is directed towards determining the extent to which biotas and regions at high risk in the future will differ from those now at risk.

Species extinction risk

My interests are in the identification and characterisation of species and populations at high extinction risk. I worked with IUCN to develop criteria and rules for species to be included in the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Current projects in this area are aimed at determining how well the pattern of current population decline serves as a reliable signal for the causes of the decline, and therefore a good  predictor of future trends; and on criteria for listing species threatened by climate change in the IUCN Red List.
Academic Background
1979 PhD Doctor of Philosophy University of Sussex
1976 BSc Bachelor of Science University of Liverpool
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